Travel: fly in comfort

Are you a lone traveller backpacking across the Andes, or do you like to see the sights with a few friends? Maybe you prefer going as a couple on a romantic getaway to Paris or New York. Or perhaps you’re one of the lucky few who travels (and sightsees) for business. If your work takes you to the bright lights of Tokyo or the vibrant beaches of San Francisco, you’re incredibly lucky.

According to the National Office of Statistics, 12% of trips abroad in 2010 were for business purposes, whilst over 65% of trips were for leisure. Yet for tall women, regardless of the purpose for their travel, the issues they face remain the same: restricted legroom in airplane seats, travel beds being too small, having to squeeze into mini-bus sized local buses — not to mention bumping your head every time you stand up whilst inside the transport vehicle.

At such times, you could be forgiven for thinking that the world of travel was not built for tall women. Certainly, scouring various websites to check vital stats before you book with an airline or ferry company isn’t always fruitful, especially when all you want to know is: will there be enough space? How much legroom will I have? Will I bump my head when I stand up?

Travelling to non-English speaking countries, worrying about travel delays and catching those all-important flight connections is stressful enough without the added hassle of finding that your travel seat is about as comfortable as an old park bench.

As well as the aches and pains you might experience during the long journey, it’s likely that you’ll arrive at your destination somewhat worse for wear and definitely not in the holiday (or business) mood. Luckily, with the help of some dedicated websites, you can spare yourself the unnecessary experience of uncomfortable travel.

Seatguru, developed with tall people in mind, provides in-depth invaluable information about a specific flight that you will not find anywhere else — not even on the airline carrier’s website. Featuring over 100 major airlines, users can check out each flight’s “seatmap graphics” which advises on the “Ëœgood seats’, the “Ëœbad seats’ and those with “Ëœsome drawbacks’.

It notes whether the seat has reduced legroom, whether the windows are misaligned and how much the seat can recline. After viewing the at-a-glance information chart of your chosen flight (including seat pitch and width), clicking on an individual air carrier will take you to the graphic map where you can navigate around the seats and the comments attributed to them.

In the space of less than ten minutes, you can discover which airlines to avoid and which to jump on: which have been designed with tall people in mind and which need improvements. You may have to pay slightly more for a better seat (and therefore experience) but when it comes to travelling in comfort, paying for an enjoyable journey is definitely a no-brainer. So, the next time you fly, make sure Seatguru is your first port of call.

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And don’t forget to check out the rest of our A to Z of Tall

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